We envision a world where breakthrough education innovations allow for all children to have access to effective learning opportunities.

 

Theory of Change

Students entering Kindergarten this year will graduate into a world that looks vastly differently than it does today. To give these students a chance to succeed in an uncertain future they need an education radically different than the antiquated curriculum so common in classrooms today. They need innovative ideas and they need them fast. That’s why we work to find the most effective solutions addressing our community’s biggest pain points and rapidly bring them to scale.

We start by building relationships with the community (parents, students, teachers, and administrators) to uncover the most deeply felt pain points like school transportation, illiteracy, and innumeracy.

We start by building relationships with the community (parents, students, teachers, and administrators) to uncover the most deeply felt pain points like school transportation, illiteracy, and innumeracy.

Then we find the most ambitious solutions and entrepreneurs working to solve these problem. Entrepreneurs that have early evidence of impact but need help scaling and reaching more students.

Then we find the most ambitious solutions and entrepreneurs working to solve these problem. Entrepreneurs that have early evidence of impact but need help scaling and reaching more students.

We match these entrepreneurs with researchers and partner schools to design a pilot study and measure their innovations’ effectiveness in a real classroom.

We match these entrepreneurs with researchers and partner schools to design a pilot study and measure their innovations’ effectiveness in a real classroom.

Then we work with the most promising innovations to help them achieve scale by leveraging collaborations between networks of schools to the benefit of both the schools and entrepreneurs.

Then we work with the most promising innovations to help them achieve scale by leveraging collaborations between networks of schools to the benefit of both the schools and entrepreneurs.


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Our Why

Education in Kansas City today is unequal.

Just one in three of our public school students reads on grade level, and inequities are most pronounced for children of color. in 2017 achievement statistics belied a grave injustice: while nearly 60% of white students scored proficient in English Language Arts, just 30% of the district’s African-American students and 40% of Latino students did.

Dedicated people are fighting for change--but progress is far too slow. Four years ago, a report found that if the district sustained its then-present rate of academic growth, it would take more than 20 years to bridge the English Language Arts proficiency gap between Kansas City and Missouri at large. Today—nearly half a decade later—growth patterns remain mostly stagnant.

Faced with this challenge, schools turn to “best practices” developed more than a century ago; fear of falling even further behind stifles innovation. Meanwhile, the voices of those most impacted by the inequities—parents, students and educators—aren’t being heard. These are the real experts in this space, but they haven’t being given the chance to engage.